Let’s Talk Pinoy!

Lualo in Ilokano or Dasal in Filipino, Ibanag and Kapampangan, means prayer. Padasal is practiced in the Philippines to pray for the dead.
Image courtesy baclaranphenomenon.wordpress.com
Welcome back everyone. Can you remember what this means from last week’s homework? Anong ginagawa mo? That’s right! It means “what are you doing?” Good job guys! I’m Dulce helping you to master your Filipino languages, and like always, let’s laugh, let’s listen, and Let’s Talk Pinoy! Let’s see how Michael is doing in our story.

Woman: “Michael… Anong ginagawa mo? (What are you doing?”)
Horror pierces through his puso (heart).

“OMG,” Michael gasps.

He slowly turns around and oo (yes), it’s Angel running to him with a horrified concerned look, and a lady laughing behind her.
Angel: Michael, ok ka lang? (are you ok?)

Michael coughs, and turns away. “Yah, I just fell down by accident.”

With a smirk on her face she says “Well ok. If you say so.”
The distant woman “Bruha, bilis, late na tayo.” (hurry, we’re late)

“Michael, this is my sister Rosie, Sis, this is Michael I just met him.”

“Ay, kadiri ka! (you’re gross) You meet men in bars!”

“Hindi, he is a nice guy I think.”

She turns around, “We have to go now, we are late for my Nanang’s get together. Dali, We have to walk fast.”

Michael excitedly shouts “No wait, I can drop you off. I have a kotse.”

Rosie: “Gaga, lagot tayo.” (We are going to be in trouble)

Angel: “Are you going to kill us Michael?”

Michael: “Do I look like a killer?”

Rosie: “No, you are like Palito. (Palito is a famous skinny, like a stick, comedian in the 60s–90s.) Where is your car?”

Michael points to the parking lot. “Right there. Palito? What does that mean?”

Rosie: “It means gwapo! Haha”

They pull up to the house, and Michael sprints to the trunk. “Let me stay and help you, you won’t even notice I am here.” He carries their bags to the house.
Rosie opens the door and a short woman greets them “Shhh… Dali! Pasok!” (hurry, come in)

“Put the bags over there, Rosie did you bring the candles?”

“Yes auntie, it is right there.”

Aunt: “Who is this man?”

Rosie says “Angel’s nobyo.”

Angel blushing, “No, no no no Auntie, just a friend. He says he wants to help us.”

Michael feeling great says “Oo tita (aunt), I will do whatever you need help with.”

“Oh great, uncle is not coming, so you can do his part.”

Aunt: “Alistuam, you are next to pray.”

“Dasal,” Michael says while examining the room. Everyone is staring at him.

Angel whispers to Michael, “This is our padasal for my Lolo. It’s his first death anniversary. You said you wanted to help.” She smiles and hands him a rosary.

Michael is barely religious. It has been maybe 10 years since he last went to church, and he was even sleeping during mass too. He has never even heard of a lualo but is quickly pushed to the front by Rosie.

Soaked, with grass in his hair, and 20 or more Lolas staring at him, Michael looks down at his rosary.
Rosie mutters “Palito, start it now”

Hi guys, awkward situation Michael is in, don’t you think?

Do you know what a lualo is? Or Dasal?

Dulce Karen Butay was graduated from Maui High School and earned her Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts from Maui Community College and her Bachelors of Science in Business Administration, specializing in Accounting, from the University of Hawai‘i – West O‘ahu. She is currently the Administrative Officer at the County of Maui, Department of Finance. Butay is a licensed Resident Producer of Life Insurance with World Financial Group and an Independent Consultant of Saladmaster. She recently became part of the Travel Club of Saladmaster and won an all-expenses paid trip to Cancun, Mexico with the love of her life. Butay recently returned from a trip to Texas as one of the delegates from Island Healthy Solutions, a dealer of Saladmaster here on Maui.

Lualo in Ilokano or Dasal in Filipino, Ibanag and Kapampangan, means prayer. Padasal is practice in the Philippines to pray for the dead. Most Filipinos believed in a concept of life after death. That the soul of the departed enters to either in heaven, hell or in between the two, is Purgatory. And because we are not sure where did our departed loved ones ended up with, we offer prayers such as the rosary or Novena, to help them go to heaven.

Well, that’s about all I have for you. Your homework is to call your mom Nanang or call your dad Tatay 20 times this week. I’m Dulce helping you to master your Filipino languages, and like always, let’s laugh, let’s listen, and Let’s Talk Pinoy! See you again next time! Ingat! (Take care!).