What Do You Think…

of the corruption problem in the Philippines?

what1 – Patricia “Tish” Paz Bautista, estranged wife of COMELEC Chair Andy Bautista recently claimed her husband received some ₱500,000 in referral fees from controversial automated election technology provider Smartmatic Corp.
Photo left courtesy Philstar.com
Photo right courtesy Inquirer.net
Over the years, elected officials, appointed government officials, and even members of the judiciary have all been accused of corruption. Recently, Andy Bautista, Jr., Chairman of the Commission on Elections (COMELEC) in the Philippines, was accused of corruption by his wife.

Fil-Am Voice staff asked members of Maui’s Filipino community “What do you think of the corruption problem in the Philippines?”

Bernie of Wailuku with roots in Cabugao, Ilocos Sur: “I believe there is still a rampant corruption in the government in the Philippines, in many agencies. COMELEC, BOC, DEPED, DLGCD, and even in the AFP. Check the lifestyles of the employees, how can they build mansions, drive in luxury cars and pay off properties in the United States? If they only get $1,000=₱50,000/month or more? Obviously, there is graft and corruption going on in many agencies.”

Cathy of Kahului with roots in Piddig, Ilocos Norte: “The corruption is very bad in the Philippines. Plenty people are involved in the corruption. The corruption affects businesses and elections.”

Cesario of Kahului with roots in Piddig, Ilocos Norte: “It’s not good the corruption because only the rich become rich.”

Danilo of Wailuku with roots in Sinait, Ilocos Sur: “Corruption is ingrained in the Pilipino culture and it is not going away. The Filipino people will tolerate it. The Padrino system is a normal way of doing business. The Filipinos think this system is okay, unless it puts them into the disadvantage.”

Dulce of Kahului with roots in San Nicolas, Ilocos Norte: “Corruption in the Philippines indeed still exists and will continue to exist until there is strong leadership to establish punitive measures and change the structure of government. It’s like a metastasis, it spreads to one another even without being directly connected.”

Flory of Makawao with roots in Sarrat, Ilocos Norte: “Corruption in the Philippines is really bad. This must be stopped. That’s why the Philippines has no improvements because of the corruption.”

Gemma of Kahului with roots in Badoc, Ilocos Norte: “The whole world is corrupt.”

Julio of Wailuku with roots in Piddig, Ilocos Norte: “Corruption is the worst practice of the government in the Philippines. Done only by the rich people and the poor become poorer. The corrupt officials are the politicians, government employees, and sometimes judges. Before President Duterte, the prevalence of corrupt judges wasn’t widely known.”

Linda of Kahului with roots in San Nicolas, Ilocos Norte: “Corruption in the Philippines should end. It does not help the people. I have to hear all the corruption on CNBC Wall Street channel and hear all about it and it’s very embarrassing so nothing has changed since I left in 1980.”

Michelle of Wailuku with roots in Dingras, Ilocos Norte: “There’s a lot of corruption in the Philippines which is bad. Corruption destroys the progress of the Philippines. It’s very sad that the government is corrupt.”

Sergei of Kahului with roots in Dingras, Ilocos Norte: “Corruption is a sad word that is attached to the government in our beloved land Philippines. I will make it short how I understand the situation. Government has a lot of amazing projects to help and make our countrymen and country proud but each project is pick pocketed by the authorized officials. Money is power so the culture was kept dirty on this corrupt officials and it’s one of the biggest links of killings just to have power. I pray and ask God to help the Philippines.”

Virgilio of Kahului with roots in Paoay, Ilocos Norte: “Corruption in the Philippines is already a tradition as far as I’m concerned. For commissioner Bautista, maybe there’s a truth in it. That’s normal for politicians and people who have positions in government and private sector. It will take several hundred years to change that system.”